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fight against 300 heavily armed taliban and insurgence. a combat outpost, and isolated base located in eastern afghanistan. >> i accept this tremendous honor on behalf of all soldiers who have served with me that they. that a soldier's it did not make it. and for the rest of the team the fought valiantly and magnificently that they, forever be humbled by the bravery, the commitment to service and the loyalty for one another. lou: the fourth living person to receive the military's highest ever for -- highest honor. the northeast slowly returning to normal after being buried under a record-setting snowstorm over the weekend that left at least zero people dead in new england. schools remain closed across much of new england and new york today. 140,000 homes and businesses still without power. meanwhile residence in mississippi are cleaning up after tornadoes cut a 75-mile path of destruction across the south central portion of the state. at least 63 people were injured. 200 homes damaged or destroyed red storm rising. is america more communist china and china more capitalist than ameri
and killed a police officer there protecting the workers. the taliban commander by way of background banned the vaccinations. says at least ten health care workers have been killed since december. pakistan, one of just three countries where polio remains a threat. >>> and kazakhstan, talks are under way about iran's nuclear program. there are representative there's from iran, germany, and the five permanent members of the united nations security council. the u.s., france, britain, russia, china. since last round of talks last june, iran's uranium enrichment program has expanded violating u.n. resolutions. >> iran's claiming its program is for civilian use only, energy and such things but western leaders fear iran is building a nuclear bomb. >>> canada, a group of scientists is now calling for food to be dna tested to make sure these things, products, are what they say they really are. >> now paula newton will report test willing keep horse meat from ending up in beef products and other types of food fraud. >> reporter: with all of the new food scares i bet you're wondering if there's any wa
did after we drove the soviets out, but as a message to the taliban and neighbors that were not walking away either. >> you were around for the iraq war and around for much of the war in afghanistan, so i feel like you have a pretty good feel on what enough forces would be. is 3,000 too little? do you have any sense of that? >> i guess the way i would put it, just in stinctively, i think 3,000 is too little and 30,000 is too many. finding the goldilocks number. i think 30,000, i think it's too high in cost for us and in terms for the afghans themselves. more a political question than a military question. >> and finally, coming up to the state of the union. you know how this works, everybody wants to hear a certain thing, depending on which department you're in. from the point of view of the military and the world at large and america's place in it, what do you look for when the president gives this speech on tuesday? >> well, it's -- it's hard to say sort of off the top of my head. i think that clearly i would like to hear something about let's figure out a way to avoid the
a reality. the dead included 10 civilians when rockets struck their nearby home. the pakistan taliban claimed responsibility for the attack, calling it revenge for a recent u.s. drone strike. the violence comes after a monthly record for u.s. drone strikes inside pakistan in more than a year. at least 33 people were killed in iraq on sunday when suicide attackers bombay police station. france continues to fight in mali. french forces have launched a number of aerial attacks in a bid to secure control of the rubber -- rebel holdout of kidal. a top commander was arrested earlier today near the border with algeria. amnesty to national is calling for an independent probe of civilian deaths in mali. dai thanh mou to describe an event were civilians were killed without warning. >> we asked if there were any warnings to the civilians who were there. they told us there had been no warnings at all. we sent a letter to the defense minister and asked him to launch an independent, impartial inquiry regarding the deaths of those four people. >> and the state is also seeking out a probe of other in
war against the taliban, against whomever, they can cut off funding. >> thank you. >> i am a student at rutgers university. john mentioned the large majority of americans support giving the president the authority to kill american citizens without charges or trial or to process. my question is, if you were identified as a threat by some nameless official in the administration, where you want to process? >> the issue is not -- [applause] john: i don't think there would name him. they might name me. >> the issue is whether we are in a war situation, whether we are operating under the war powers of the constitution or whether we are in a law enforcement situation. the to have radically different approaches. we killed tens of thousands of american citizens, maybe hundreds of thousands with no due process in the civil war, and it was the right thing to do. [applause] john: on that note we're out of time. >> you want to discredit a movement, defend the confederacy. go ahead. john: ambassador bolton. no more time left. thank you for joining us and taking these difficult questions. students,
, you know the story, taliban gunmen shot her in the head at point blank range because she publicly advocated educating girls. listen to how well she is healing. >> today you can see that i am alive. i can speak. i can see you. i can see everyone. and today i can speak and i'm getting better day by day. it is just because of the prayers of people, because all the people, men, women, children, all of them, all of them have prayed for me. >> incredible. her british doctors say malala will not need any more surgeries. >>> cheez-its and a hot wheels car, those are the items that a kidnapper requested for his 5-year-old captive. it is now one week since jimmy l dykes allegedly shot a school bus driver to death and took th this boy hostage. it is still not known one week later what the kidnapper's motive is. the alabama hostage suspect in that bunker is said to be a survivalist. and coming up tonight on "ac 360," looking at the survivalist moment, 8:00 p.m. eastern here on cnn. >>> the family of mohamed ali fighting back against the rumors that he's near death. loved ones tweeted out seve
are more and more effective in powering afghan communities to defend against taliban intimidation and violence. plans are being developed to increase the authorized size of the alp program from 30,000 to 45,000. the next centcom commander will also play an important role in shaping our enduring partnership with afghanistan after 2014. the partnership that i fully support. ike m. concerned however by the plants to reduce the afghan national security forces by a third starting in 2015. 352,000 to 230,000 by 2017. i believe that any future reductions in the size of the afghan forces should be based on security conditions in afghanistan at that time and this afghan security forces make and providing for their country security, we should reassure them that we will continue to support these efforts by deciding that as we withdraw our forces that there won't get drawdown and afghan forces. progress in afghanistan remains fragile and significant challenges to afghanistan's long-term stability remain. among the greatest threat to its stability are the safe havens for afghan insurgents acro
qaeda, the taliban, and its associated forces. second, in this conflict, as indeed in any conflict, the united states is lawfully entitled. and finally, whatever the constitution's due process guarantees may require before targeting a u.s. citizen, these requirements are more than satisfied by rigorous judgment that a person needs the administration's narrow targeting. to understand why this position must be correct, consider a domestic hostage situation. in such a situation, even law enforcement will use this command it will do so without judicial preapproval when the threats of the lives of the hostages is serious. nobody takes the position that such actions constitute and killings. it is not profoundly different from this hostage situation. a mounting chorus of critics has insisted that judicial review must be a feature of the framework that authorizes the targeting of american nationals. whatever the merit of these mechanisms, one point is very clear. current law simply does not provide for prospective judicial involvement in targeting decisions. it is therefore hard for having
. we went because it met our goal to give it about qaeda. we have been in the taliban government and set the country sorted into free play, we develop some kind of moral responsibility for helping them get it right. third, geostrategic plates in america in the world's interest to have a stable region. if afghanistan were unstable, acting pakistan's stability would be very tenuous and it challenges anyway, but i think it's important. my view is that we need to do is be persistent and consistent in the region. the reason people are so nervous is because in 2004 the inc. were going to leave and they seemed asleep before. in 1989 returned from the region. it doesn't matter whether each afghan style that appeared its become a commonly accepted truth that we left in 1989 and they're starting to think we're going to walk in 2014 and there will be nobody they can rely on. they'll have other strategic allies. so what they looking for is the idea of a long-term strategic partnership. i don't think that the specific number of troops. i think it's the idea you got an ally somewhere in their
out of her hands. but in pakistan the government is still providing shelter for the taliban. and there's still no real solid ra approachment between us and then. so it is very hard to see that her soothing, her repairing of applianc appliance-- alliances necessarily resulted in concrete policy achievements. >> suarez: susan, wasn't it a pretty complicated mess, not only where places as trudy knows, like pakistan, but even with some of america's closest allies. >> well, that's exactly right. i mean these are times where, you know, you play the hand you are dealt as secretary of state not only because the white house decides the big picture policy. but the world over the last four years has been a complicated place who would have expected that actually europe our closee-- closest allies would have been in a period of enormous internal turmoil greater than anything they have seen since the end of world war 2. so clinton was left to manage those relationships. i think i would say that she was often a soother, but often as not she was also someone who would speak out in a tough manner. look
not for afghans. they didn't invite in 2001. it meant our goal to get rid of al qaeda. when we upped the taliban government and set the country in to free play, i think we developed a responsibility for helping them set it right. third, i think in america and the world's interest to have a stability region. if afghanistan were to be completely unstable, i think pakistan's stability would be very tenuous. and they have challenges anyway. i think it's important. so my view what we need to do is be consistent and persistent in the region. the reason people in afghanistan are nervous because in 2004, they think we're going leave and they have seen us leave before. in 1989 we turned from the region. it doesn't matter which each individual afghan saw that. it's become commonly accepted truth we left in 19 the 9 ab and they're walk in 2014. and they'll be nobody they can rely on. they don't have other strategic allies. what they're looking for, in my view, the idea of a long-term strategic partnership. i don't think that's a specific number of troops in a specific amount of money. ink it's the idea you
. but this is old news, when i was with them in 2009, during the war and when the taliban ruled the valley, her father's name was announced on the fm airways, and death threats were issued against him. so now, >>> good evening, americans, and welcome to "the ed show" from new york. eric cantor has a new tube of lipstick, but it's the same old pig. this is "the ed show." let's get to work. >> our solutions will be based on the conservative principles of self-reliance, faith in the individual, trust in family, and accountability in government. >> the new and improved republican party takes another crack at repackaging bad ideas for america. tonight, i'll take eric cantor's speech apart, word by word. >>> house republicans reveal their plan to reform immigration. it's not a path to citizenship. it's a path to permanent underclass. >> mr. issa is recognized for five minutes. >> i'll have all the latest on today's big hearing. >>> plus, an explosive new document obtained by nbc news reveals the united states government's justification for killing american citizens without due process. tonight, rober
. security officials say it's mostly controlled by militants affiliated with the taliban. seven kills, six injured. officials say no civilians were hurt in the strike. app to get a tow truck. it's gonna be 30 minutes. oh, so that means that we won't be stuck up here, for hours, with nothing to do. oh i get it, you wanna pass the time, huh. (holds up phone) fruit ninja!!! emergency roadside assistance. just a click away with the geico mobile app. i worked a patrol unit for 17 years in the city of baltimore. when i first started experiencing the pain, it's hard to describe because you have a numbness but yet you have the pain like thousands of needles sticking in your foot. it was progressively getting worse, and at that point, i knew i had to do something. when i went back to my health care professional, that's when she suggested the lyrica. once i started taking the lyrica, the pain started subsiding. [ male announcer ] it's known that diabetes damages nerves. lyrica is fda approved to treat diabetic nerve pain. lyrica is not for everyone. it may cause serious allergic reactions or suicida
to get rid of al qaeda. but we appended the taliban government and set the country in the free plate i think we develop some kind of moral responsibility for helping them set it right. third dimaggio's strategically at think it is in america and the world's interest to have a stable region. if america were to be completely unstable i think that pakistan stability would be very tenuous and they have challenges in the way, but i think it is important so my view is what we need to do is be consistent and persistent in the region. the reason people in afghanistan are so nervous is because in 2004 they think we're going to leave, and they have seen it happen before. in 1989 returned from the region. the intimate does not matter whether each individual afghan saw that, it has become commonly accepted truth that we left in 1989, and they're starting to think we're just going to walk in 2014 and there will be nobody that they can rely on. they do not have other judges to catalyze. so what they're looking for in my view is the idea of all long-term should jiji partnership. i don't think that is
about what it's like to live with the taliban? what it's like to live with al-qaeda. tearing down statues of religious icons, terrorizing women, making it unlivable for people who are trying to start a business. why don't we talk about that? instead, you want to blame the united states. i don't understand it. >> well, i've been to afghanistan many times, juan, and i'd be happy to go with you. i feel that after ten-plus years of occupation there, when we leave, the afghan people are going to be struggling themselves over who is in control of their government. we can't come in from the outside and socially engineer other people's countries. what we have to do is protect ourselves here at home. >> juan: amany at protecting ourselves by killing terrorists and doing it strategically, surgically as opposed to launching a full scale war. but you don't seem to agree. >> that's just not true. we're creating more enemies than we're killing. we're violating international law and our own constitution, including americans overseas with absolutely no judicial process. that is shameful. >> juan:
the government is still providing shelter for the taliban. and there's still no real solid ra approachment between us and then. so it is very hard to see that her soothing her repairing of appliance appliance-- alliances necessarily resulted in concrete policy achievements. >> suarez: susan wasn't it a pretty complicated mess not only where places as trudy knows like pakistan but even with some of america's closest allies. >> well, that's exactly right. i mean these are times where you know, you play the hand you are dealt as secretary of state not only because the white house decides the big picture policy. but the world over the last four years has been a complicated place who would have expected that actually europe our closee-- closest allies would have been in a period of enormous internal turmoil greater than anything they have seen since the end of world war 2. so clinton was left to manage those relationships. i think i would say that she was often a soother but often as not she was also someone who would speak out in a tough manner. look at her championship with the russians. even
. >> there was an interesting story. >> in yemen. >> he was -- he agreed to meet with a member of the taliban which was a very brave thing for him to do. al-qaeda. it was a brave thing for him to do. while they were meeting, they were voiprized by a drone. shocking story. a muss let me [delete]cleric on our side who had preached did the dangers of al-qaeda. and warning people not to be affiliated with them. he, himself, is blown away by a drone strike. >> one of the problems of remote control room warfare, you don't know exactly who you are killing. >> jay carney yesterday also made the point that, yes, we have the authorization, as does this -- the white paper, 16 pages, this authorization to conduct drone strikes exists under the blanket authorization for the war on terror that was given george w. bush by the congress right after september 11th. >> uh-huh >> bill: it's the same authorization that was cited by george bush to justify rendition, torture waterboarding, and wiretapping. >> right and also done in great sec res see. people kept asking carney about t
ultimately were teaming with taliban fighters, so we talked about that in a special that will air at 10:00 tonight. >>> combat outpost keating was built in 006 with so many troops and assets deployed to iraq, those in afghanistan had to make do. one part of the strategy was to build small outposts as the u.s. pushed into eastern afghanistan. the location was a trap evident from the moment the uniate rrived in may 2009. what was your first reaction? >> first reaction was i think the same as everybody that stepped foot on that, this is a pretty indefensible spot. >> i thought we were supposed to be on top of a mountain. this is crazy. i mean, that's how i felt, you know. shooting up? but you just, i was there, you know, i can't be like this is stupid. >> reporter: this say part of the called the hindu kush mountain range you're either on or in a valley. in order to be near the local population and near the road combat outpost keating was put at the bottom of three steep mountains. ♪ soldiers had been fatally attacked there before. in 2007, private chris pfeiffer, in 2008, camp commander
. it was to liberate because the plan was overthrow saddam, get out of there, just like we overthrew the taliban in afghanistan and god as they are and of course afghanistan fell apart and we had to go through that. we are facing an insurgency. we don't know what to do. all the officers there hadn't been trained to fight this sort of war. the listening manuals. they did what they usually do, banged on doors and arrest and kill people and anyone who had read kahlÚa or naco what now is counterproductive because you end up killing the wrong people. he off their cousins and brothers who may become insurgents, too. so petraeus in mozilla decides to put into effect the ideas he's learned. so he and his guys, they start setting up an election for the new district council. they said at the elections. they bring in field trip from turkey. they get communications systems going. they get iraqis to open up newspapers. he opens at the border to syria along northern iraq. he does all this on his own. he's not touring with coronation of anybody, washington or baghdad or any place that works for a while and th
the medicine 2001. we met our goal to get rid of al qaeda. we have under the taliban government and set the country started into screenplay, we developed some more responsibility for helping him set a rate third, i think it's an america in the center a stable region. if afghanistan were completely unstable, who'd be very tenuous but it's important. we need to be consistent and persistent in the region. the reason people in afghanistan are so nervous is because in 2004 they think we're going to leave and 18 asleep before. in 1889, we turn from the region. it doesn't matter whether each individual afghans saw that, it's become commonly accepted truth they don't have other strategic allies. so what they're looking for in my view is the idea of a long-term strategic partnership. but i think that's a specific number of troops, even a specific amount of money. their fear is they are very far away. i was asking him this question. i said what you want in the future years quite homage to see what here? said a word about business and i'll be here taking money. because if you're making money here
afghan communities to defend against taliban intimidation and violence. plans are being developed to increase the authorized size of the program from 30,000 down to 45,000. the next commander will also play an important role in shaping our partnership with afghanistan after 2014. a partnership that i fully support. i am concerned however by plans to reduce the afghan national security forces by a third starting in 2015. of retreated 52,000 to two injured 30,000 by 2017. i believe any future reductions in the size of the afghan forces should be based on security conditions in afghanistan at that time and as afghan security forces' progress in providing for their country's security, we should reassure them that we will continue to support these efforts by citing as we withdraw our forces that there won't be a drawdown in afghanistan forces. progress in afghanistan remains fragile, significant challenges to afghanistan's long-term stability remains. among the greatest threat to the stability is the safe havens for the afghan insurgents across the pakistan border which the government
afghan united states operation targeting taliban fighters in the northeast part of the country. >> the united states and russia are coming together to try to find a resolution to the ongoing crisis in syria. secretary of state john kerry speaking today with russia's foreign minister on the phone about the best way to use their respective influence to end the bloodshed. and now live to jerusalem and this is an important move on of behalf of russia, and the united states? >>reporter: russia is syria's biggest backer and john kerry spoke to the russian foreign minister after trying to reach the russian foreign minister but nothing particularly concrete came out of this discussion only a promise to meet face to face in the future. the fighting is et cetera can -- is escalating in aleppo with opposition fighters stepping up attacks on airbases capturing two regime airports. assad troops have responded by shelling several rebel-held areas and the u.n. is trying to make another push to open up talks between opposition groups and the syrian government. both sides have refused to talk t
to us and said they were going to renounce themselves from the taliban. and this is how i believe we win the war, for what it's worth. i believe that by lowering the supporters of the taliban and by that and stopping their freedom of movement, we win the war and stop terrorism. so that's what we were trying to do on this mission. but almost immediately upon entering the village, my team was under attack. it was an ambush, and it was big. it didn't take me long to realize that it wasn't a normal ambush. i've been in quite a few fire fights by this time, but it's like at the first of any fire fight it's kind of like the dust comes in, you try to figure out any situation, the dust comes in, you figure it out, and then your training kicks in, and you just start doing your job after about 10 or 15 minutes. but not in this fight. it was like one thing after another started to fail us. and everything started to fall like a house of cards. everything that we relied on in every other fire fight to support us wasn't happening. it was like our mission was falling quickly like a house of cards. and
out secret effort to persuade the taliban to expel bin laden. as we know, bin laden was not expelled. three months later, his wrath was unleashed with an attack on our embassies. did you advise director tenant against this operation? and if so, why? >> i had a conversation with george and that at the time. every single cia manager, george tennant as deputy director of operations at the time, and other individuals at the counter-terrorism center argued against that operation as well because it was not well grounded in intelligence, and its chances of success were minimal. and it was likely that other individuals would be killed. when i was involved in those discussions, i provided the director and others my professional advice about whether i thought that operation should go forward. i also was engaged in discussion with the saudi government at the time. and i encouraged certain action to be taken to put pressure on the taliban as well as bin laden. >> i take it that your answer to my question is that you did advise in favor of the cancellation of that operation. >> based on what i ha
are told. >>> in the united kingdom doctors say the pakistani teen activist shot in the head by the taliban is doing well. some good news. this coming after five hours of surgery over the weekend. they say she won't need any more operations. this really is an extraordinary story. malala yousafzai became a symbol of courage after she was attacked for her crusade to educate pakistani girls. doctors say they are pleased with the progress malala is making and we will hear from her in a minute. first we will bring in our chief medical correspondent. sanjay, good to see you. you are of course a neurosurgeon, you have done these types of surgeries before. sometimes in the battlefield, as i recall. explain for us what was involved in replacing this piece of missing bone in her skull. the most extraordinary thing is you have this girl shot in the head, she was so eloquent and speaking so well. tell us how you did this. >> reporter: it's extraordinary on many levels. there are all types of injuries. and certainly neurosurgeons want to know exactly what happened to the brain. what exactly the type of
equipment over the air. and you just happen to be selling to a guy that is taliban-related or whatever. and well, are you exposable because -- i don't know if you're familiar -- >> stephanie: you're losing me. say this again. if you're an american -- in afghanistan? >> caller: correct. say you've got business over there. you're over there selling whatever -- oil rigs, i don't know. but you've got some contact with a known terrorist. i mean how are they -- i know that they've come out and said the press secretary said that you know, we'll limit casualties. we'll try to cut down on casualties. but let's take it -- that it is one of you or me and where are they doing business? we're innocent enough. it just seems -- >> slippery slope. >> fuzzy for me. >> i'm a little bit troubled by the ruling on this. a lot troubled. >> stephanie: here's eric holder yesterday on this. >> we only take these kinds of actions when there is an imminent threat. when capture is not feasible and when we're confident we're doing so in a way that's consistent with federal and international law. >> you can say tha
thousands of al qaeda and taliban, but more than 300 civilians, as well. a world away in remote villages, you can hear them. like a distant muted chain saw. a dull but deadly roar. villagers describing it this way. the drones are all over my brain. i can't sleep. when they're hovering over us, we're all scared. a reality we seldom see says stanley mcchrystal, the retired general who once ran the military's drone strike program. >> if the threshold gets too low and we're too casual about it, then we'll forget how much scar tissue we have built up in those countries. >> reporter: general mcchrystal believes americans should have the chance to know about these secret drone wars to weigh the benefits and risks. they will have that opportunity when john brennan speaks. martha raddatz, abc news, jerusalem. >> one of the more interesting things in our post 9/11 world. we've seen this debate before, whether it was waterboarding and torture, whether it was abu ghraib, about how far are we willing to go to protect ourselves, if it means compromising our ideals when it comes to due process and civi
it was overran by the taliban. he's somebody who is very aware of things that did not go the way of the americans that way. he blames himself still for troops that were lost that day, even though there's nothing that he could have done to save them, they are still very, very tough on him receives when it comes to the eight men that were killed that day. >> he is a real, real hero and he will be honored. i want to alert our viewers, jake has a special tonight. jake tapper reports "an american hero" it airs at 10:00 p.m. eastern only here on cnn. >>> john brennans wasn't the only administration official taking heat up on capitol hill today. up next, the reason the outgoing defense secretary leon panetta is giving for why the u.s. military could not save lives in benghazi. get ready for a lot more of that new-plane smell. we're building the youngest, most modern fleet among the largest us airlines to ensure that you are more comfortable and connected than ever. we are becoming a new american. to find you a great deal, even if it's not with us. [ ding ] oh, that's helpful! well, our company does that
teenagers, generally want to stop at the time they're 30 and 20 taliban it's bad for them, you remind them of the fact that they couldn't control their own destiny so they get anxious, and what did they do? facebook. it's a coping mechanism. we get a large trial at colombia university sponsored by the nih. wanting as with which we can have depressed people in the trial. we had to cancel the trial but we couldn't find a single smoker who was not clinically depressed. the fundamental insight yet again is what to do to help these folks? i would argue that you take a couple different paths. one is show them what's happening. this is what a smoker's lung looks like. you can't hide from the. just look at the darn thing. at 11:00 you see that? as emphysema. the dark tar deposits is pretty evident as well from the cigarettes. and when you see that you have awareness and understanding why this matters to you. but the second insight you have, we offer is there certain times you can change people's minds. as a heart surgeon i don't have a lot of control of people who come in for surgery. i've done my
Search Results 55 to 104 of about 105 (some duplicates have been removed)

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